GESTA REGUM ANGLORUM PDF

The habit of reading, he tells us, has been a source of pleasure to me ever since I was a boy, and its charm grew as I grew. Indeed, I had been brought up by my father to regard it as damaging to my soul and my good repute if I turned my attention in any other direction In particular I studied History, which adds flavour to moral instruction by imparting a pleasurable knowledge of past events, spurring the reader by the accummulation of examples to follow the good and shun the bad. So after I had spent a good deal of my own money on getting together a library of foreign historians, I proceeded in my leisure moments to inquire if anything could be discovered concerning England worth the attention of posterity. Not content with ancient works, I began to get the itch to write myself, not to show off my more or less non-existent erudition but in order to bring forcibly into the light things lost in the rubbish-heap of the past. The impression given here is that William was writing, not in the service of his religious house or of some other interest group, but out of his own private enthusiasm for history, and especially the history of his native land.

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Biography[ edit ] Though the education William received at Malmesbury Abbey included a smattering of logic and physics , moral philosophy and history were the subjects to which he devoted the most attention.

The evidence shows that Malmesbury had first-hand knowledge of at least four hundred works by two hundred-odd authors. He later edited and expanded it up to the year , releasing a revision dedicated to Robert, Earl of Gloucester. This "second edition" of the Gesta Regum , "disclosing in his second thoughts the mellowing of age", [8] is now considered one of the great histories of England.

William wrote of William the Conqueror in Historia Anglorum: He was of just stature, extraordinary [9] corpulence, fierce countenance; his forehead was bare of hair; of such great strength of arm that it was often a matter of surprise, that no one was able to draw his bow, which himself could bend when his horse was in full gallop; he was majestic whether sitting or standing, although the protuberance of his belly deformed his royal person; of excellent health so that he was never confined with any dangerous disorder, except at the last; so given to the pleasures of the chase, that as I have before said, ejecting the inhabitants, he let a space of many miles grow desolate that, when at liberty from other avocations, he might there pursue his pleasures.

His anxiety for money is the only thing on which he can deservedly be blamed. This he sought all opportunities of scraping together, he cared not how; he would say and do some things and indeed almost anything, unbecoming to such great majesty, where the hope of money allured him. I have here no excuse whatever to offer, unless it be, as one has said, that of necessity he must fear many, whom many fear.

For this vivid descriptive history of abbeys and bishoprics, dwelling upon the lives of the English prelates saints, notably the learned wonder-working Aldhelm, abbot of Malmesbury , William travelled widely in England.

It is possible that this acquaintance, coupled with the positive reception of his Gesta Regum earned him the offered position of Abbot of Malmesbury Abbey in William, however, preferred his duties as librarian and scholar and declined the offer. His one public appearance was made at the council of Winchester in , in which the clergy declared for the Empress Matilda. This work breaks off with an unfulfilled promise that it would be continued: presumably William died before he could redeem his pledge.

A strong Latin stylist, he shows literary and historiographical instincts which are, for his time, remarkably sound. He is an authority of considerable value from onwards; [12] many telling anecdotes and shrewd judgments on persons and events can be gleaned from his pages. Some scholars criticise him for his atypical annalistic form, calling his chronology less than satisfactory and his arrangement of material careless.

William merely translated the document from Old English into Latin. Barker Typographij Regii, London Migne , Patrologia Latina vol. I, Edited and Translated by M. Winterbottom and R. Thomson, Oxford University Press , Thomson, Oxford University Press,

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Biography[ edit ] Though the education William received at Malmesbury Abbey included a smattering of logic and physics , moral philosophy and history were the subjects to which he devoted the most attention. The evidence shows that Malmesbury had first-hand knowledge of at least four hundred works by two hundred-odd authors. He later edited and expanded it up to the year , releasing a revision dedicated to Robert, Earl of Gloucester. This "second edition" of the Gesta Regum , "disclosing in his second thoughts the mellowing of age", [8] is now considered one of the great histories of England. William wrote of William the Conqueror in Historia Anglorum: He was of just stature, extraordinary [9] corpulence, fierce countenance; his forehead was bare of hair; of such great strength of arm that it was often a matter of surprise, that no one was able to draw his bow, which himself could bend when his horse was in full gallop; he was majestic whether sitting or standing, although the protuberance of his belly deformed his royal person; of excellent health so that he was never confined with any dangerous disorder, except at the last; so given to the pleasures of the chase, that as I have before said, ejecting the inhabitants, he let a space of many miles grow desolate that, when at liberty from other avocations, he might there pursue his pleasures.

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William of Malmesbury

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